The Only Personal Finance Blog You Need

Decluttering my bathroom a few days ago, I came across a tired looking little bottle of Burberry perfume. It was purchased roughly 4 years ago for me by my now husband. I don’t remember what the occasion was but it was some holiday. it may have been valentines day, my birthday, our anniversary or Christmas. Like most Americans we have traditionally bought each other and everyone else we know often extravagantly expensive and unnecessary presents for every occasion. That is but one leak in our huge explosive geyser of waste that has been our financial situation from the time we just met each other 7 years ago to just about 6 months ago when I discovered the Mr Money Mustache blog. since discovering that blog my life has changed so dramatically.

Not only am I more active, I’m way more practical, healthy and financially competent. I am actually way enthusiastic about making the changes I have, such as deciding to sell my car, buying a bike and bike trailer and getting really really really cheap cell phone plans. Also preparing all my meals at home from scratch and no longer buying unnecessary stuff has made my life not just more frugal but actually more enjoyable. I enjoy thinking up ways to save money and can’t wait to do even more in the future. I started this blog originally because I have so many ideas bouncing around in my head, but this concept of easy frugality has been a game changer.

I no longer care about what other people are doing with their money. Of course, deleting Facebook caused me to look more closely at my own life- my own priorities and values instead of everyone else’s. I have gone on a low-information diet, and I now see so much clearer than I did when my mind was cluttered with unnecessary information from magazines, commercials, advertisements and the regular onslaught of meaningless shit from random people, most I may barely know.

I admit, with each change I make it does feel as if I’m about to step off a cliff. In the end I usually decide to take the leap because I have assurance that there will be a wonderous net of a beautiful, simple naturalistic and free lifestyle that will catch me as I let go of all the trappings of my consumer driven life. The feeling is an intense and addicting combination of excitement and fear. the more stuff I get rid of the more stuff I want to get rid of.

A big part of me is still afraid that everyone who comes over to my house will judge me for not having all the makings expected of an average target-shopping suburban housewife home. I’m also afraid that my husband will start/continue to think I’m crazy and will be unhappy to leave his comfortable bubble of consumption. Even with all these looming possibilities, what I want is to be surrounded by the items that mean something to me. I want my dwelling to be filled with only the objects and tools that make me smile, that serve my life in a positive way and help me to become the person I believe I am meant to be.

Right now, for me, that means getting rid of my TV. Not just my TV, but also the Xbox and Netflix. I will still have my computers which I can use to get entertainment and information and watch DVDs (as I have a Mac from 2008 that still plays them.) I’m afraid that if I do this there will really be no turning back. I will no longer be able to lay back on the couch and flip on the screen and forget about my problems. I will no longer be able to keep up with all the new episodes and series that are coming out, leaving me with a little bit less to talk about with other everyday people.

The only downside is that the more I let go of the more I am becoming an outsider. I hope that one day I can find a community where I can truly learn and grow and not feel ashamed of the lifestyle I am choosing. Until then I will keep making small steps and jumping off the cliffs as they come up. Of course I will report what happens strait back to you. Thanks for coming along with me on this journey.


Why I Broke Up With Wholefoods

You know when you were a little kid and you knew a field trip was coming up? And the night before the field trip you’d toss and turn with excitement? Well, I used to think of making the journey to the Wholefoods in Sacramento with the same feeling. I had just become vegan at the time (I was a teenager living at home in the suburbs), and Wholefoods was like the golden ticket to eating all the food I was used to eating in my sinfully omnivorous days. Tofutti Break! was a popular outcry in my house, and I had several brands of soy burgers always in rotation. There was also a point a few years later when I had just finished reading Alicia Silverstone’s The Kind Diet that I spent $500 on a whole slew of macrobiotic groceries that filled up my personal mini fridge and a dedicated pantry shelf at Wholefoods. The checker did not bat an eye.


Now that I live an hour from the nearest Wholefoods, I’ve learned to completely live happily without it, and have grown to respect the many ways in which taking Wholefoods out of my grocery equation has saved me time, money, and a whole lot of empty calories from my diet. First I started with the organic options at my nearby HEB, which I’ve found you really can get by with most of the basics such as spinach apples, and all kinds of pantry staples. In the produce department I graduated to using Bountiful Baskets, a more direct supplier-to-customer type of group that has spread nearly everywhere.

They have the regular basket and also the organic basket, which is regrettably quite a bit smaller than the regular basket at while a full $10 more is tacked on to the price tag. Now I am so happy with a strait up CSA (community supported agriculture) program brought to me by Austin’s own Johnson’s Backyard Garden. Not only is the organic produce so much more fresher, it is very local and a farm that is actually a family business that cares about its customers. There is no huge line to wait in either! I just pick up my basket at my local organic restaurant So Natural.

I have been very excited in stocking up on most of my bulk dried items (such as beans and grains) at In.Gredients, the FABULOUS zero-waste market in Austin. But because of the distance I only go by when I have other activities that call me that direction. Otherwise, it’s the organic options for these one-ingredient packaged foods at HEB. I also use SAM’s Club for their surprising offerings like organic agave nectar, almond butter, bananas and Chia seeds.

Melluvia Babe enjoying organic whole rolled oats for brekkie

Nowadays, most of the food I eat is very simple, and made of extremely basic ingredients, such as oatmeal with raisins for breakfast, a simple salad with leftover veggie soup for lunch, and a flavorful asian stir fry with rice for dinner. As you stop buying packaged, frozen, canned and otherwise processed foods you really begin to stop craving them. As you only have the basic items in your arsenal, you are forced to get creative in the kitchen. I’ve started to love cooking again, and really knowing that the food I’m eating and feeding my family is not only completely healthy but didn’t cost me an arm and a leg.

I still have many friends that continue to shop at Wholefoods and love it. One friend on the Dr. McDougall diet fills her cart with frozen fruit. Another is an overweight vegan who stocks up on the wildest of novel concoctions of foodstuffs like lemon bar flavored sugar free raw paleo dessert morsels. While I do think Wholefoods can be an exciting place with a world of flavor possibilities, it is so easy to spend a WHOLE lot of money on (when it comes down to it) what is simply energy for your body.

I look forward to posting my next blog about other new changes going on in my life right now!

4 Steps to a Calm your Clutter

We all have been there at one time or another in our lives. Life gets busy, the job gets demanding, the social life gets full, and before you know it there’s a pile of clothes here, a paper laden countertop there. When you live in your house, it’s easy to allow clutter to build up and then sink into the background where it just becomes part of the scenery. If you ever look at model homes, or homes on pinterest or in magazines, it seems so clean and organized, in a way that is almost unattainable for those of us normal folk who don’t have professional organizers, interior designers or housekeepers dropping by any time soon. Even though we are just one person who is likely knee deep in everything else that is going on in our lives, there are still a few things we can do to create a beautiful, peaceful and organized home for ourselves. After all, what is the point of being at home if we cannot relax and feel tranquil while there?

1. Find ONE place for everything.

I’m sure by now you’ve heard the old motto “A place for everything and everything in its place” likely spoken in your mind by a sixties housewife with a blonde bob and freshly pressed white cotton sundress. But one way to make that more attainable in reality is to have all items of the same type in one place together, instead of spread out around the house. For instance, keep all linens in the hall closet, all towels in the main bathroom (except the one for your child or guests in the extra bathroom), All baking stuff on one shelf in the kitchen, all mail in one designated spot. This makes it so much easier to find things and also encourages you to go put it back.

2. No Duplicates

I’m going to throw myself under the bus here and admit that at one time we had three different board games of Monopoly. No, they were not different themed monopoly boards, just good ol’ classic monopoly. Why? There is no real reason and they were just taking up mores space. Of course there are exceptions such as coffee mugs and other eatery, pens and other dispensables. But don’t go too crazy with stockpiling those either!

3. Keep Only What is Practical

There is no set list for this, as what’s practical to one person may be completely unnecessary or useless to another. The other day I read a blog that insisted one doesn’t need a rice cooker or a bread machine in their kitchen. Well, maybe some people. But I believe no matter what items you have, as long as you use them regularly then that’s what matters. For seasonal items, they should be stowed away. For items that you haven’t used in over a year… you know where I’m going with this, don’t you?

“But what about my great grandmas antique silk paintaquiltdoily from the 30s?” you ask. That brings me to…

4. Keep Only What You LOVE

This one is probably the hardest of all. When we get gifts, especially from people we care about, it is hard to let go of those things when we really just don’t want or need them. Sometimes we might spend a lot of money on an item that we absolutely were obsessed with at the time. Other things we may have used a lot or identified with in the past, but just don’t serve us any more. It’s important to constantly reevaluate what you have in your home as it’s definitely affecting your energy and the vibes you are surrounding yourself with. Now is the time to let go of anything that is slightly less than what you are happy about.

There you have 4 simple ways to declutter your space. Really about 90% of it is donating or throwing away everything that’s keeping you from a beautiful, organized and happy environment. For a great read that elaborates on this idea, check out The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up.

Wishing for Less

Sometimes all we need is a little less. There is a huge and profound connection between owning less, having less stress, spending less money and having less health problems. When we let go of the things in our life that don’t serve us by either being of practical use or pleasing to our senses, we actually begin to highlight the things in our life that really do serve us by making us more happy and productive.

The more we let go of, the more gratifying it is to live our lives amongst the treasured and trusted objects that we have carefully selected to be a part of our day to day routines. We begin to notice the way we feel more, we have space for quiet contemplation and tranquility in our day. When we own less it also forces us to think creatively. Instead of going to the store so we can buy all the latest technology, we can spend our time exploring the potential of the nifty things we already own- such as all the settings of our digital camera or rediscovering our collection of CDs from college (Radiohead, anyone?). When we own less there is less to worry about, manage and maintain. Even if it is as simple as a big assortment of totes with random bits and bobs taking up space in the attic, it still causes us mental clutter when we are reminded of these items and we expend mental energy trying to remember what is stored there and if those things are still useful to us, and even thinking about decisions of what to do with the items. When we surround ourselves with only the things that we truly love and care for, we feel less compelled to purchase new items on a whim or because everyone else has it. This saves us loads of money over time- money that we can use to pay off debt, invest, or donate to a great cause. When we become less stressed, we have the mental energy to pursue our interests instead of parking it on the couch for a night of TV watching. Even better- when we cut out TV all together, we automatically will find other exciting activities to pursue that don’t involve sitting in front of a screen. Naturally this will help to burn calories as we spend our time having fun and being active.

These are just some of the many ways that owning less opens up doors to exuberant happiness in our lives. There are no rules or time limits to how one should go about minimizing, and the journey to owning less will be as unique as the person taking it.